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New Cricket Rules And Regulations

icc cricket rules and regulations

International Cricket Council is the global governing body of cricket. I t was founded as the Imperial Cricket Conference in 1990 by representatives from Australia, England, and South Africa. It was renamed as the International Cricket Conference in 1965 and took up its current name in 1989.

It organizes world championship events such as Cricket World Cup, Women’s Cricket World Cup, ICC T20 World Cup, ICC Women’s T20 World Cup, ICC Championship Trophy and Under-19 Cricket World Cup.

Cricket rules and regulations are framed and governed by this body which is known as the International Cricket Council.

The ICC has 104 members: 12 Full members that play Test matches and 92 Associate Members.

Cricket Bowling rules and regulations decided by International Cricket Council are:-

  1. Fair and Unfair Play:- It is the solely responsibility of the captains for ensuring that game is conducted within the spirit of equality and honesty full of spirit and considerations of the game as described in the document, The Preamble- The Spirit of Cricket, as well as within the laws.
  2. Fair and Unfair Play:- It is also the main responsibility of umpires. The umpires shall be the solo judges of fair and unfair play. If either umpire considers an action, not covered by the laws, to be unfair, he shall intervene without appeal and, if the ball is in play, shall call and signal Dead ball and implement the procedure as set out In 18 below. Otherwise, the umpires shall not interfere with the progress of play, except as required to do so by the laws.
  3. The match ball- changing its condition
    • It is unfair for anyone to rub the ball on the ground for any reason, interfere with any of the seams or the surface of the ball, use any implement, or take any other action which is likely to alter the condition of the ball,
    • The umpire should make frequent and regular inspections of the ball.
  4. A deliberate attempt to distract striker:- It is unfair for any member of the fielding side deliberately to attempt to distract the striker while he is preparing s receive a delivery.
    • If either umpire considers that any action by a member of the fielding side is such an attempt, at the first instance he shall.
    • If there is any further such deliberate attempt in that innings, by any member of the fielding side, the procedures, other than warning proper action must be taken on an immediate basis.
  5. Deliberate distraction or obstruction of batsman:- In addition to the previous point, it is unfair for any member of the fielding side, by word or action, willfully to attempt to distract or to obstruct either batsman after the striker has received the ball.
    • It is for either one of the umpires to decide whether any distraction or obstruction is willful or not.
    • Neither batsman shall be dismissed from that delivery.
    • The umpire at the bowler’s end shall inform the captain of the fielding side of the reason for this action and as soon as practicable, inform the captain of the batting side.
    • The shall not count as one of the over.
  6. Dangerous and Unfair Bowling there are two conditions of dangerous bowling they are:-
    • Bowling of fast short-pitched balls.
    • Bowling of high full pitched balls.
  7. Dangerous and Unfair Bowling action by the umpire:-
    • As soon as the umpire at the bowler’s end decides under the regulations mention that the bowling of fast short-pitched balls has become dangerous and unfair, there is an instance of dangerous and unfair bowling as prescribed cricket rules and regulations he shall call no signal or no-ball and, when the ball is dead, caution the bowler, inform the owner umpire, the captain of the fielding side and the batsman of what has occurred. This caution shall continue to apply throughout the innings.
    • If there is any further instance of dangerous and unfair bowling by the same bowler in the same innings, the umpire at the bowler’s end shall repeat the above process and indicate to the bowler that this to a final warning.
    Both the above caution and final warning shall continue to apply even though the bowler may later change ends.
  8. Deliberate bowing of high full pitched balls:- If the umpire considers that a high full pitch which is deemed to be dangerous and unfair was deliberately bowled, the umpire shall be:-
    • Call and signal No ball.
    • Direct the captain, when the ball is dead, to take the bowler off forthwith.
  9. Time wasting by the fielding side:- It is unfair for any member of the team of the fielding side to waste time.
  10. Batsman Wasting Time:- It is unfair for a batsman to waste time, in normal circumstances the striker when the bowler is ready to start his run-up.
  11. Damaging the Pitch:- are to be protected:-
    • It is incumbent on all players to avoid unnecessary damage to the pitch. It is unfair for any player to cause deliberate damage to the pitch.
    • An area of the pitch, to be referred to as “the protected area” is defined as that area contained within a rectangle bounded at each end by imaginary lines parallel to the popping creases and 5ft/ 1.52m in front of each and on the sides by imaginary lines, one each side of the imaginary line by joining the centers of the two middle stumps, each parallel to it and 1ft/30.48 cm from it.
  12. Bowler running on the protected area after delivering the ball:-
    • If the bowler, after delivering the ball, runs on the protected area is defined in 11 (b) above, the umpire shall at the first instance, and when the ball is dead.
    • If in that innings, the same bowler runs on the protected area again after delivering the ball, the umpire shall repeat the above process, indicating that it is a final warning.
    • If, in that innings, the same bowler runs on the protected area a third time after delivering the ball, when the ball is dead the umpire shall allow taking prompt actions.
  13. Fielder damaging the pitch:-
    • If any fielder causes avoidable damage to the pitch, other than at the first instance the umpire shall, when the ball is dead is not allowed.
    • If there is any further avoidable damage to the pitch by any fielder in that innings, the umpire shall when the ball is dead.
  14. Bowler attempting to run-out non-striker before delivery:- The bowler is permitted, before entering his delivery stride, to attempt to run out the non- striker. The ball shall not count in the over.
    The umpire shall call and signal Dead ball as soon as possible if the bowler fails in the attempt to run out the non-striker.
  15. Batsman damaging the pitch:-The bowler is permitted, before entering his delivery stride, to attempt to run out the non-striker. The ball shall not count in the over. The umpire shall call and signal dead ball as soon as possible if the bowler falls in the attempt to run out the non-striker.
  16. Batsman stealing a run:- It is unfair for the batsmen to attempt to steal a run during the bowler’s run-up. Unless the bowler attempts to run out either batsman see-15 above and 24.4 (Bowler throwing towards striker’s end before delivery)- the umpire shall,
    • Call and signal Dead ball as soon as the batsman cross in any such attempt.
    • Returns the batsman to their original ends.
    • Award 5 penalty runs to the fielding side see 17 below.
    • Inform the other umpire, the batsmen, the captain of the following side and as soon as possible and practicable, the captain of the batting side of the reason for the action taken.
    • Report the occurrence, with the other umpire, as soon as possible to the Executive of the batting side and any Governing body responsible for the match, who shall take such action as is considered appropriate against the captain and the player or players are considered.
  17. Penalty runs:-
    • When penalty runs are awarded to either side:- when the ball is dead the umpire shall signal the penalty runs to the scores as laid down in Law 3.14 (Signals).
    • Notwithstanding the provisions of Law 21.6 (winning hit or extras), penalty runs shall be awarded in each case where the Laws require the award Note, however, that the restrictions on awarding penalty run in-laws 26.3 (Leg byes not be awarded), 34.4(d) (Runs permitted from ball struck lawfully more than once) and Law 41.4 (Penalty runs not to be awarded) will apply.

These are all the cricket rules and regulations for every cricket match prescribed by International Cricket Council.

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Devendra
Devendra is a passionate sports person as well as a blogger that loves to write the sports blog, especially about cricket.

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